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As a valued member of our Paniolo Pediatric and Family Medicine family, we appreciate the trust you place in us and want to inform you about how we are addressing the coronavirus COVID situation. . Your self-determined toddler can sometimes present a challenge when it comes to brushing her teeth.

Try this: Sit on the floor cross-legged, placing your child on her back, resting herself on your leg. You are now looking down at her, while she is looking up at you. Let your child brush your teeth while you brush hers. You'll get lo of cooperation, as well as a good look at those molars!

Connie Giarratana, M. Sometimes, consequences are obvious; other times, parents struggle to come up with one for a troublesome behavior. Try this: ask your child to come up with the consequence of a particular behavior. It may not be the most effective solution, but it is rewarding and sometimes quite entertaining!

Together, you might just find a solution that works. Alternatively, explain to your child that parenting is a hard job, and parents don't know all the answers. Then, ask your child what he would do if he were a parent and had to solve this problem. Again, you may hear responses that you will treasure forever, and also might just work! Make sure your child care provider or baby sitter has immediate access to critical information in case of an emergency: Make a copy of your child's insurance card, and on the back attach a typed list of emergency phone s where you can be reached, as well as the for your local poison control center.

You may also want to note any allergies or medical conditions your child may have. Have this two-sided emergency card laminated at your local copy center, place it in a pocket of your child's diaper bag or backpack, and remember to tell the sitter where it can be found.

At dinnertime, try stimulating conversation with your children by asking, "What one good thing happened to you today? This question is better than "How was school? Our hectic, busy lives often leave us with little time to appreciate the magic of encouragement in our children's development of self-esteem.

Positive strokes and expressions of love often are forgotten and replaced with negative reprimands. Here's a sure way to remember the importance of praise: take your wrist watch or other piece of jewelry and place it on the opposite hand from which you are accustomed to wearing it. Throughout the day, when you look at your watch or jewelry on the "wrong" hand, you will be reminded to say something supportive and positive to your child. Dan Feiten, M.

Children learn more easily to do personal chores e. Put some time aside for melding the chores into the routine. The time will come when the chores will have to be performed quickly, efficiently, and without assistance, but it will go more smoothly if they are second nature and already part of the established routine. When children do not seem to pay attention or listen to what you are saying, you may find yourself repeating everything you ask, often raising your voice with each repetition. Instead, the first time that you calmly make your request, make sure that your child has direct eye contact with you.

Then, ask him to repeat what you said so that you know he understood. Sometimes, this will prevent the familiar cycle of repeating yourself! Kathleen Traylor, M. Once children are preschool age and older, have each child take one night a week, or one night a month, as dinner night. Let him decide what he wants to serve, shop with him, and let him direct you in helping with the preparations.

Children love doing it, and it gives you fewer dinners to plan yourself! Administering eye drops can be uncomfortable to a toddler. Have your child lie on his back and shut his eyes as tight as he can. Place one to two drops in the inner corner of each eye. Tell him to relax his eyes. The liquid will seep into the eye without tears or fuss! Wipe off the excess with a clean cloth or tissue. Whenever you open your mouth to say the words "don't," "no," "not," "stop," or any other similar negative word, pause.

Then, replace the negative word with a positive alternative. This way, your words convey a positive suggestion, rather than a negative reprimand. For example, if you are about to say, "Stop teasing your sister! On some days, disciplining your children seems to go smoothly; on other days, it seems to be a complete disaster.

It is amazing how this can help you to handle the situation more calmly and effectively, rather than being angry and losing your cool. When your child spills something, drops something, or creates a mess, pause before getting upset. Then, calmly ask your child what she was trying to do. You might be surprised at her answers, and you might learn things about your child and her thinking that you would never have known if you had gotten upset. Sometimes, your child really is just trying to help! Once you know what she was trying to accomplish, you can talk calmly about ways that it might work better next time.

Establishing rules with children is an opportunity to teach the meaning behind them. For example, rather than telling your child "no running" at the swimming pool, point out the . Explain that this rule is necessary because the lifeguards are in charge of everyone's safety, and that water makes the surface next to the pool slippery.

Some children may want to discuss possible injuries; other children may want to discuss why water makes cement slippery; and still other children may agree to follow the rule just so they can go swimming. Children can be miserable with many common illnesses, but viral stomach flu can be particularly miserable for both the child who feels so poorly and the parent who must clean up another episode of vomiting or diarrhea.

Since vomiting is a given of childhood, try to add humor to it. Pick out a bucket or other similar container. Then, give it a name e. Use the bucket solely for this essential and honorable task, and you will know what it means when your child yells for it! Most children rarely get the chance to change an adult's mind using their own logic. However, developing logical thoughts is important to their decision-making and communication abilities. For example, dinner is taking longer than expected to prepare. A half-hour before it, your child asks for a snack.

Usually, he hears, "Not so close to dinner. Similarly, your child is hungry. You do have a legitimate concern that sweet snacks will ruin his appetite. Try stating it in a way that will elicit a logical response: "My only worry is that fruit snacks will keep you from eating your dinner. Then, come to a compromise that allows a small nutritional snack, and keeps you both in good spirits when dinner is served. Sometimes, waking children up in the morning to get ready for school or daycare can be frustrating and stressful, especially if they are grumpy and resistant.

Try this: Have the children take turns being the first one awakened, and let that child go and wake up the other child or children. Sometimes, this simple strategy makes more excited about waking up, and it makes mornings more enjoyable. It is amazing how nice the children can be to each other in the process. Since they are taking turns, they realize what kind of wake-up call they would like to experience when it is the other child's turn!

Getting preschoolers and school-age children to take medicine can be very challenging for parents. Try this: pour the medicine into a small medicine cup, measuring out the exact amount prescribed by your doctor. Then, "top it off" with several teaspoons of either strawberry or chocolate syrup.

You also can try this for medicine in tablet form. First, using two spoons, crush the pill into a fine powder. Then, put the powder into the medicine cup, and fill it with flavored syrup. Stir until the powder is dissolved, and let your child drink it up! Most rules can, and should, be discussed within a family.

In many homes, a rule not up for discussion is that there are no rewards for crying. For example, your child really wants something, and it is refused. Then, your child starts to cry, often very dramatically. As soon as the tears start, the child gives up any negotiating power. Calmly saying, "I'm sorry, we can't even discuss this now," will quickly take the steam out of the crying tactic.

Parents often wonder about the normal growth of their children. While general guidelines can be followed, always remember variations are the norm with kids! Typically, height doubles between 3 and 4 years old; then, it triples by 13 years old based on height at birth. Sometimes, as a parent, yielding to your child's desires e. Weaning from the pacifier can be a dreaded chore of parenting. The longer is attached to the pacifier, the harder it becomes to get rid of it. Between six to nine months of age, limit the pacifier to the car and the crib. Between 12 to 15 months of age, take your child to a toy store and let him pick out a new, cuddly, security item.

Tell him it is time to say "bye" to his pacifier, while frequently reminding him of his new security object.

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